Your clients won't value what you do...

Builders Little Black Book
By Chris Newton
Monday, 23 July, 2018


Your clients won't value what you do...

Ever heard the phrase ‘the more you tell, the more you sell’? When it comes to selling your creative ideas, it’s the little things that count.

Allowing your clients to see you as someone who builds ordinary pools or provides ordinary landscaping means you will always be competing on price — working your heart out and attracting clients who expect the cheapest of everything and the low prices to match.

As a pool builder or landscaper your creativity should shine — not only in your designs, but in your ability to solve problems and to educate your clients. I know this from first-hand experience. Many years ago my wife and I decided to build a pool and landscape the surrounds. Not only did our builder produce a superb resort-style outcome for us, he constantly educated my wife and me on the small details that we may have missed.

He’d invite us to inspect the pavers first-hand, have us crouch down and then say, “You’ll notice we’ve used a diamond cutter to cut these pavers so they fan out evenly in patterns. It creates a magic effect when it’s done properly.”

We’d then move to the timberwork and he’d be at it again, “Have a look under here at how my carpenter has checked in the timberwork. It’ll be out of sight when the pool is filled, but you’ll know the true craftsmanship that has gone into building your pool.”

Nothing escaped his attention, or him bringing it to ours, “I have personally chosen the rocks used in the waterfall for both their size and shape and have placed them specifically to create the flow and splash patterns of a natural rainforest waterfall,” he would say.

While every other builder may also do these things — use a diamond cutter to cut pavers precisely, insist on neat timberwork or hand-pick rocks — how many of them would take the time to point it all out to a client? These things might not seem special if you are doing them every day, but they are special to the client once they know.

Unsurprisingly, I went on to outline those ‘special’ details dozens of times over — to friends and colleagues and in presentations to business owners. I couldn’t say enough good things about my builder and what he had created for us.

If he had simply done those things, but didn’t educate us about quality workmanship, small hidden details and his creativity, would we have raved about it? Of course not. He had effectively made the invisible visible and, as a result, I became a vocal advocate of his business and the best kind of client you can have.

No-one raves about ordinary and the untrained eye can’t always appreciate what goes into a project, so it’s up to you to point it out. By doing this on every project you complete, you’ll build an army of unpaid salespeople who continue to sing your praises to everyone they encounter. It’s a simple way to build value into what may otherwise be missed and to avoid being seen as a builder of ‘ordinary’.

Image credit: ©stock.adobe.com/au/Stuart Miles

Related Articles

The digital divide

The way Australians source and select trades and other service providers is changing. Can you...

2018 wages and salary survey

In order to remain competitive in the swimming pool and spa industry, businesses must be able to...

Seven signs of a difficult customer

We've all been there... the customer that makes life so difficult you wonder why you went...


  • All content Copyright © 2018 Westwick-Farrow Pty Ltd